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Movie Quote of the Day – Boyz n the Hood, 1991 (dir. John Singleton)


boyz_n_the_hood

Furious Styles: I want y’all to look at that sign. See what it says? “Cash for your home.” You know what that is?
Ricky Baker: It’s a billboard.
Tre Styles: Billboard.
Furious Styles: What are y’all, Amos and Andy? Are you Steppin’ and he’s Fetchit? I’m talking about the message. What it stands for. It’s called “gentrification.” It’s what happens when property value of a certain area is brought down. You listening?
Tre Styles: Yeah.
Furious Styles: They bring the property value down. They can buy the land cheaper. Then they move the people out, raise the value and sell it at a profit. What we need to do is keep everything in our neighborhood, everything, black. Black-owned with black money. Just like the Jews, the Italians, the Mexicans and the Koreans do.

Movie Quote of the Day – Event Horizon, 1997 (dir. Paul W. S. Anderson)


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Miller: Weir?
Dr. Weir: The ship brought me back. I told you she won’t let me leave – she won’t let anyone leave. Did you really think you could destroy this ship? She’s defied space and time. She’s been to a place you couldn’t possibly imagine. And now… it is time to go back.
Miller: I know. To hell.
Dr. Weir: You know nothing. Hell is only a word. The reality is much, much worse.

Oscar Vault Monday – Mystic River, 2003 (dir. Clint Eastwood)


I hadn’t seen this movie until last weekend. I have no idea why I waited so long to see it. I mean, it has a stellar cast and Clint Eastwood is a favorite of mine (as a writer and a director). It’s also based on Dennis Lehane novel (who also wrote the novels on which Shutter Island and Gone Baby Gone were based), with a screenplay written by Brian Helgeland (who shares an Oscar with Curtis Hanson for their on L.A. Confidential). Despite all of that, it took me nearly a decade to actually watch the film. Boy was it worth the wait. It’s probably one of the most tense films I’d ever seen. It was nominated for six Oscars winning two: Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Supporting Actress Marcia Gay Harden, Best Supporting Actor Tim Robbins (won), Best Actor Sean Penn (won), Best Director and Best Picture. Incidentally, this was the first time Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor had come from the same film since 1959’s Ben-Hur. The other films up for Best Picture that year were Lost in Translation, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, Seabiscuit and winner The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King.

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Oscar Vault Monday – Apocalypse Now, 1979 (dir. Francis Ford Coppola)


While nothing can replace The Thin Red Line as my all-time favorite war film, I think this movie would be a close second, even if I did just see it for the first time on Saturday (I know, I know). I’d like to point out first off that I watched the Redux version and not the theatrical version, so this post will be based on that version of the film. I’m also not going to talk a lot about some of the behind the scenes stories (there are a lot) and probably won’t cover all the themes in the film because I feel like the only way to do everything about this film justice would be to write 100 pages. I will, however, talk about the main performances and a couple of scenes that I really loved. The film was nominated for eight Academy Awards, winning two: Best Sound (won), Best Cinematography (won), Best Art Direction, Best Film Editing, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor Robert Duvall, Best Director and Best Picture. The other films nominated for Best Picture that year were All That Jazz, Breaking Away, Norma Rae and winner Kramer Vs. Kramer. Side note: I really love Kramer Vs. Kramer, so this is not a “this film is better than the winner” post; it’s more like a “this film is equally as awesome” post.

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