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Movie Quote of the Day – Crime Wave, 1954 (dir. André De Toth)


crime_wave

Girl: We had sort of a lover’s quarrel.
Jess: It was nothing, nothing at all!
Girl: We don’t really fight. We’re just sort of playful. The last time I threw a lamp at him, he thought it was cute. But tonight he forgot himself and screamed and the neighbors called the police.
Jess: It was ridiculous of them to call the police. Especially as we have invited them to all our parties.

Movie Quote of the Day – Crime of Passion, 1957 (dir. Gerd Oswald)


crime_of_passion

Kathy Ferguson Doyle: I hope all your socks have holes in them and I can sit for hours and hours darning them!
Police Lt. Bill Doyle: I have other plans for you.
Kathy Ferguson Doyle: Oh?

Movie Quote of the Day – Naked Alibi, 1954 (dir. Jerry Hopper)


Chief Joe Conroy: Are you in the habit of hauling in cut-up strangers?
Marianna: Yeah. It’s a hobby with me.

Movie Quote of the Day – Johnny Guitar, 1954 (dir. Nicholas Ray)


Johnny: There’s nothing like a good smoke and a cup of coffee. You  know, some men got the craving for gold and silver, others need lots of land with herds of cattle, and there’s those that got their weakness for whiskey and for women. When you boil it all down, what does a man really need? Just a smoke and cup of coffee.

Movie Quote of the Day – The Killing, 1956 (dir. Stanley Kubrick)


Johnny Clay: You like money. You’ve got a great big dollar sign there where most women have a heart.

Oscar Vault Monday – Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb, 1964 (dir. Stanley Kubrick)


I love this film. It is one of the funniest films I’ve ever seen. It’s also one of the most clever satires ever filmed. Simply put, I think this film is brilliant. Along with Citizen Kane, this film not winning Best Picture is one of the biggest “what?!?” moments in Oscar’s past. Though, I will say the biggest travesty of 1964 is Peter Sellers not winning Best Actor. Rex Harrison is my least favorite aspect of My Fair Lady and the fact that he beat not only Sellers from this film, but Peter O’Toole and Richard Burton from Becket for Best Actor in 1964 just makes me so very angry. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb was nominated for four Academy Awards, though it failed to win any: Best Actor Peter Sellers, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Director and Best Picture. The other films up for Best Picture that year were Becket, Mary Poppins, Zorba The Greek and winner My Fair Lady.

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