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Movie Quote of the Day – Jane Eyre, 1970 (dir. Delbert Mann)


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Jane Eyre: Why do you confide in me like this? What are you and she to me? Do you think that because I am poor and plain, I have no feelings? I promise you, if God had gifted me wealth and beauty, I should make it as hard for you to leave me now as it is for me to leave you. But He did not. Yet, my spirit can address yours as if both had passed through the grave and stood before Him equal
Mr. Rochester: Jane.
Jane Eyre: Let me go, sir.
Mr. Rochester: I love you. I love you!
Jane Eyre: Please, don’t make me foolish.
Mr. Rochester: Foolish? I need you. What is Blanche to me? I know what I am to her. Money to manure her father’s lands with. Marry me, Jane, say you’ll marry me.
Jane Eyre: You mean it?
Mr. Rochester: You torture me with your doubts. Say yes. Say yes.

Movie Quote of the Day – The Changeling, 1980 (dir. Peter Medak)


John Russell: You goddamn son of a bitch. What is it you want?  What do you want from me? I’ve done everything I can do!  There’s nothing more to do.

Movie Quote of the Day – Anatomy of a Murder, 1959 (dir. Otto Preminger)


Judge Weaver: Mr. Biegler, you finally got your rape into the case, and I think all the details should now be made clear to the jury. Do you agree, Mr. Lodwick?
Mitch Lodwick: Absolutely.
Judge Weaver: What exactly was the undergarment just referred to?
Paul Biegler: Panties, Your Honor.
Judge Weaver: Do you expect this subject to come up again?
Paul Biegler: Yes, Sir.
Judge Weaver: There’s a certain light connotation attached to the word “panties.” Can we find another name for them?
Mitch Lodwick: I never heard my wife call ’em anything else.
Judge Weaver: Mr. Biegler?
Paul Biegler: I’m a bachelor, Your Honor.
Judge Weaver: That’s a great help. Mr. Dancer?
Claude Dancer: When I was overseas during the war, Your Honor, I learned a French word. I’m afraid that might be slightly suggestive.
Judge Weaver: Most French words are.

Movie Quote of the Day – The Rescuers Down Under, 1990 (dir. Hendel Butoy, Mike Gabriel)


McLeach: [realizes he has one less egg] Did you take one of my eggs?  [Joanna, with an egg in her shut mouth, shakes her head no]  Open your mouth. [Joanna opens her mouth, moving the egg on her tongue to the side. McLeach sees it anyway] These are NOT… Joanna Eggs! [he closes the egg box]

Oscar Vault Monday – The Hustler, 1961 (dir. Robert Rossen)


This is one of those films that sucks you into its world and doesn’t let up for a moment until it’s over. Then afterwards you realize you’ve forgotten to breathe for two and a half hours. This is definitely one of Paul Newman’s best performances, though pretty much all of Paul Newman’s performances are his best because, like Jack Lemmon, Newman is always good. The Hustler was nominated for nine Academy Awards, winning two: Best B&W Art Direction (won), Best B&W Cinematography (won), Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor Jackie Gleason, Best Supporting Actor George C. Scott, Best Actress Piper Laurie, Best Actor Paul Newman, Best Director and Best Picture. The other films nominated for Best Picture that year were Fanny, The Guns of Navarone, Judgement at Nuremberg and winner West Side Story.

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Oscar Vault Monday – Dr. Strangelove Or: How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love The Bomb, 1964 (dir. Stanley Kubrick)


I love this film. It is one of the funniest films I’ve ever seen. It’s also one of the most clever satires ever filmed. Simply put, I think this film is brilliant. Along with Citizen Kane, this film not winning Best Picture is one of the biggest “what?!?” moments in Oscar’s past. Though, I will say the biggest travesty of 1964 is Peter Sellers not winning Best Actor. Rex Harrison is my least favorite aspect of My Fair Lady and the fact that he beat not only Sellers from this film, but Peter O’Toole and Richard Burton from Becket for Best Actor in 1964 just makes me so very angry. Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb was nominated for four Academy Awards, though it failed to win any: Best Actor Peter Sellers, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Director and Best Picture. The other films up for Best Picture that year were Becket, Mary Poppins, Zorba The Greek and winner My Fair Lady.

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Movie Quote of the Day – Patton, 1970 (dir. Franklin J. Schaffner)


Gen. George S. Patton Jr.: Now I want you to remember that no bastard ever won a war by dying for his country. He won it by making the other poor dumb bastard die for his country.

Oscar Vault Monday – Anatomy of a Murder, 1959 (dir. Otto Preminger)


I first saw this movie during TCM Summer Under The Stars last August and it made me fall in love with Lee Remick. She is something else in this film, a film that also features a stellar ensemble cast. I also feel I must point out that this was the year that Ben-Hur won Best Picture and as much as I like Anatomy of a Murder there’s no comparison between the two. Especially in terms of scope and pure cinematic epicness. Ben-Hur is the kind of film that could only be a film, whereas Anatomy of Murder could have worked just as well as a play. That being said, Anatomy of a Murder is an amazing film and definitely worth your time. It was nominated for seven Academy Awards, though it failed to win a single award: Best B&W Cinematography, Best Film Editing, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor Arthur O’Connell, Best Supporting Actor George C. Scott, Best Actor James Stewart and Best Picture. The other films nominated for Best Picture that year were The Diary of Anne Frank, The Nun’s Story, Room at the Top and winner Ben-Hur (which won eleven Oscars).

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