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Movie Quote of the Day – Don’t Bother to Knock, 1952 (dir. Roy Ward Baker)


don't_bother_to_knock

Eddie Forbes: What’s the smile about?
Nell Forbes: You seem so different in those clothes.
Eddie Forbes: I’m different all the time.

 

Movie Quote of the Day – 1941, 1979 (dir. Steven Spielberg)


1941

Captain Wild Bill Kelso: The Japs tried to bomb San Francisco last night. Two squadrons of Jap Zeroes. I’ve been trackin’ them ever since. I lost them somewhere over Fresno.
Patron: Radio says that’s not true about San Francisco. It was just a case of war nerves.
Captain Wild Bill Kelso: War nerves? Who said, “war nerves”?
Patron: I heard it on that radio there.
Captain Wild Bill Kelso: Radio’s wrong.

Oscar Vault Monday – The Maltese Falcon, 1941 (dir. John Huston)


I thought it would be fitting to start Noirvember with a discussion of John Huston’s iconic adaptation of Dashiell Hammett’s The Maltese Falcon. Although film noir, a term coined in 1946 by French film critic Nino Frank, is often thought of as an post-war era in American cinema (many neo-noir and foreign films would later emulate these original films), this film has been cited as the first true American Film Noir. There’s a great debate about when the era starts and whether it counts as a genre (I don’t believe in genres period, so you can probably guess where I stand on that issue). A lot of the early crime films in the thirties and the silents made during German Expressionism all led to the style and topics seen in the noir films, but for me I think the films made during this era were distinctly full of post-war angst. That said, I’ll admit if The Maltese Falcon isn’t the first true noir, it’s definitely the premiere proto-noir. The film essentially launched Humphrey Bogart as a leading man, following his explosive earlier that year in Raoul Walsh’s High Sierra, in a performance that set the tone for all of noir’s anti-hero heroes to come. The film was nominated for three Academy Awards, though it didn’t win any: Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Supporting Actor Sydney Greenstreet and Best Picture. The other films nominated that year were: Blossoms in the DustCitizen KaneHere Comes Mr. JordanHold Back the DawnThe Little FoxesOne Foot in HeavenSergeant York (co-written by John Huston), Suspicion and winner How Green Was My Valley.

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