Blog Archives

Movie Quote of the Day – A Woman’s Secret, 1949 (dir. Nicholas Ray)


a_woman's_secret

Luke Jordan: You said something about “Ever since you came to New York.” Where do you come from?
Susan Caldwell: Azusa. Azusa, California.
Luke Jordan: Azusa?
Susan Caldwell: It’s kind of a made-up word. Different letters. They put them together. Everything from A to Z. USA. AZUSA.
Luke Jordan: I still don’t get it. What does the USA stand for?
Susan Caldwell: United States of America. Everybody knows that.

Advertisements

Movie Quote of the Day – Christmas Holiday, 1944 (dir. Robert Siodmak)


christmas_holiday

Robert Manette: You know, sometimes when I listen to it I feel that, that there’s nothing that man is capable of that I can’t do. Then it stops and it’s over.
Abigail Martin: Oh, not for me. When I hear good music I feel, well I feel as though something had been added to my life that wasn’t there before.
Robert Manette: I’d like that. Think you can teach me?

Movie Quote of the Day – Dinner At Eight, 1933 (dir. George Cukor)


Kitty Packard: I was reading a book the other day.
Carlotta Vance: Reading a book?
Kitty Packard: Yes. It’s all about civilization or something. A nutty kind of a book. Do you know that the guy says that machinery is going to take the place of every profession?
Carlotta Vance: Oh, my dear, that’s something you need never worry about.

Movie Quote of the Day – Citizen Kane, 1941 (dir. Orson Welles)


Charles Foster Kane: Don’t go, Susan. You mustn’t go. [beat] You can’t do this to me.
Susan: I see. So it’s you who this is being done to. It’s not me at all. Not how I feel. Not what it means to me. [laughs] I can’t do this to you? [beat] Oh, yes I can.

Movie Quote of the Day – The Pride of the Yankees, 1942 (dir. Sam Wood)


I have been walking onto ball fields for sixteen years, and I’ve never received anything but kindness and encouragement from you fans. I have had the great honor to have played with these great veteran ballplayers on my left – Murderers’ Row, our championship team of 1927. I have had the further honor of living with and playing with these men on my right – the Bronx Bombers, the Yankees of today. I have been given fame and undeserved praise by the boys up there behind the wire in the press box, my friends, the sportswriters. I have worked under the two greatest managers of all time, Miller Huggins and Joe McCarthy. I have a mother and father who fought to give me health and a solid background in my youth. I have a wife, a companion for life, who has shown me more courage than I ever knew. People all say that I’ve had a bad break. But today…today I consider myself the luckiest man on the face of the earth.