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Movie Quote of the Day – Far from the Madding Crowd, 2015 (dir. Thomas Vinterberg)


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Bathsheba Everdene: It is difficult for a woman to define her feelings in a language chiefly made by men to express theirs.

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Movie Quote of the Day – The Greatest, 2010 (dir. Shana Feste)


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Ryan: Are you really pregnant?
Rose: Yeah.
Ryan: It figures. The one bad thing my brother does and he’s not even here to get in trouble for it.

Movie Quote of the Day – The Great Gatsby, 2013 (dir. Baz Luhrmann)


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Daisy Buchanan: I wish I’d done everything on earth with you. All my life. I wish it could always be like this.
Jay Gatsby: It will be.

Movie Quote of the Day – Shame, 2011 (dir. Steve McQueen)


Sissy Sullivan: I make you angry all the time and I don’t know why.
Brandon Sullivan: No. You trap me. You force me into a corner and you trap me. “I’ve got nowhere else to go.” I mean, what sort of fucking shit is that?
Sissy Sullivan: You’re my brother.
Brandon Sullivan: So what? I’m responsible for you?
Sissy Sullivan: Yes.
Brandon Sullivan: No, I’m not.
Sissy Sullivan: Yes you fucking are.
Brandon Sullivan: No. I didn’t give birth to you. I didn’t bring you into this world.
Sissy Sullivan: You’re my brother, I’m your sister. We’re family, we’re meant to look after each other.
Brandon Sullivan: You’re not looking after me; I’m looking after myself.
Sissy Sullivan: I’m trying. I’m trying to help you.
Brandon Sullivan: How are you helping me, huh? How are you helping me? How are you helping me? Huh? Look at me. How are you helping me? You come in here and you’re a weight on me. Do you understand me? You’re a burden. You’re just fucking dragging me down. How are you helping me? You can’t even clean up after yourself. Stop playing the victim.
Sissy Sullivan: I’m not playing the fucking victim. If I left, I would never hear from you again. Don’t you think that’s sad? Don’t you think that’s sad? You’re my brother.

“Shame,” “Tyrannosaur” and “Tinker Tailor” Lead British Independent Film Award Nominations


So many films on this list that I’ve yet to see, but definitely want to. Hopefully we’ll see a little bit of an overlap between these nominations and the Oscars. Mostly I’m thinking for Steve McQueen, Michael Fassbender and Carey Mulligan, though Shame‘s NC-17 rating may still be a hurdle the film’ll need to overcome stateside. I’d also like to see a Best Actor nomination for Gary Oldman. I still haven’t seen Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, but boy is he overdue. He’s never even been nominated! That’s a travesty that must be remedied soon.

The winners are decided by an independent jury comprised of people from within the British film industry. This year’s jury includes: Josh Appignanesi (Director / Writer), Lucy Bevan (Casting Director), Edith Bowman (Broadcaster), Mike Goodridge (Editor), Ed Hogg (Actor), Neil Lamont (Art Director), Mary McCartney (Photographer), Molly Nyman (Composer), Debs Paterson (Director / Writer), Tracey Seaward (Producer), Charles Steel (Producer), David Thewlis (Actor), Ruth Wilson (Actress) and Justine Wright (Editor). The winners be announced on December 4th. Full list of nominees after the cut.

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New Trailer For Steve McQueen’s “Shame”


This looks fantastic. I’m already really digging the mood and Fassbender and Mulligan seem to be firing on all cylinders.

You can watch the trailer here. Shame is set to open in the US on December 2nd.

It’s In My Nature, Reflections on Nicolas Winding Refn’s “Drive”


“Have you ever heard of the story of the scorpion and the frog?” the nameless Driver (Ryan Gosling) asks movie-producer-turned-mobster Bernie Rose (Albert Brooks) towards the end of Nicolas Winding Refn’s masterpiece Drive. In that one line, when you put it in context, you get everything you need to know about the character. Heck, he’s even wearing a jacket with a scorpion on it for 99% of the film.

There has been much said about the hyper-violence that punctuates Refn’s otherwise hypnotic drama. Some love it, some think it detracted from the story.

I happen to think Refn’s execution of the violence was pitch perfect and Gosling’s superb performance just reinforces the story’s message: you can’t escape your nature.

The Driver doesn’t think about his violent acts; he just does them. They’re part of his nature, the way he instinctually reacts to certain situations. Think Viggo Mortensen’s character in A History of Violence.

He’s clearly tried to repress them in his day-to-day life – hence his day job as a mechanic. He’s even tried to find other outlets for his violent nature (i.e. his other two jobs).

But he just can’t help it; it’s in his nature. And when these explosions of violence happen what’s most interesting is the look on the Driver’s face afterwards, especially in the elevator scene. He did what he had to do, but he’s both appalled that he did it and appalled that someone so dear to him had to witness it.

There’s another telling moment in the film that I really loved. When the Driver is talking to the son of Irene (Carey Mulligan) while the two watch cartoons. He asks if the shark in the cartoon is a bad guy and the son immediately says yes. The Driver asks him how can you tell? The son says he looks like a bad guy, plus have you ever seen a good shark?

I found that scene particularly fascinating because again the Driver is wrestling with his inner demons. He knows he is a violent man, he knows that he does illegal things; that he is, in some shape or form, a “bad guy.” Yet, you wouldn’t be able to tell that from looking at him.

I also love when Gosling and Brooks face off at the end. Like the Driver, Brooks’ Bernie is a man who is violent by nature. This scene is like all the great showdowns in classic Westerns; only instead of guns the two exchange false promises, both knowing the other is figuring out just the right moment to strike. They’re both scorpions and neither one wants to let the other across the river.

While Gosling’s performance may be too subtle for Awards Season, I’m thinking Brooks’  performance won’t be forgotten – Hollywood loves to “rediscover” someone, especially in a bravado performance that is so completely against type.

The last thing I wanted to mention is how much I love all the attention to detail that Refn put into this film. He won Best Director at the Cannes film festival in May, and rightfully so.

There’s this amazing color story throughout the film. Mostly in shades of teal blue and this sort of golden amber color. Everything from the streetlights to the bedspread in a motel fit into this color scheme. As the film progresses and the violence increases the amber begins to turn into this darker red color. It’s just fucking brilliant.

I’ve seen this film in theaters three times now and I still want to see it again. and again. and again. It’s everything I want in a film. If it’s playing near you, I urge you to go and give it a chance yourself.

Movie Quote of the Day – Never Let Me Go, 2010 (dir. Mark Romanek)


Kathy H.: What I’m not sure about is if our lives have been so different from the lives we save. We all complete. Maybe none of us understand what we’ve lived through or feel we’ve had enough time.

Winter’s Bone, The King’s Speech Lead Detroit Film Critics Society Nominations


Most of these are pretty expected. The biggest surprises are no nomination for either Annette Bening or Julianne Moore for The Kids Are All Right and no Inception or The Town for Best Ensemble. I’m really excited to see both Carey Mulligan’s performance from Never Let Me Go and Jennifer Lawrence from Winter’s Bone included in the Best Actress category. Both were absolutely astounding and from films that weren’t huge box office successes. Also, I love that John Hawkes got another nomination for his stellar performance in Winter’s Bone.

Best Film
127 Hours
Inception
The King’s Speech
The Social Network
Winter’s Bone

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New Poster Trio For “Never Let Me Go”


These are flipping fantastic.