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Movie Quote of the Day – Shame, 2011 (dir. Steve McQueen)


Sissy Sullivan: I make you angry all the time and I don’t know why.
Brandon Sullivan: No. You trap me. You force me into a corner and you trap me. “I’ve got nowhere else to go.” I mean, what sort of fucking shit is that?
Sissy Sullivan: You’re my brother.
Brandon Sullivan: So what? I’m responsible for you?
Sissy Sullivan: Yes.
Brandon Sullivan: No, I’m not.
Sissy Sullivan: Yes you fucking are.
Brandon Sullivan: No. I didn’t give birth to you. I didn’t bring you into this world.
Sissy Sullivan: You’re my brother, I’m your sister. We’re family, we’re meant to look after each other.
Brandon Sullivan: You’re not looking after me; I’m looking after myself.
Sissy Sullivan: I’m trying. I’m trying to help you.
Brandon Sullivan: How are you helping me, huh? How are you helping me? How are you helping me? Huh? Look at me. How are you helping me? You come in here and you’re a weight on me. Do you understand me? You’re a burden. You’re just fucking dragging me down. How are you helping me? You can’t even clean up after yourself. Stop playing the victim.
Sissy Sullivan: I’m not playing the fucking victim. If I left, I would never hear from you again. Don’t you think that’s sad? Don’t you think that’s sad? You’re my brother.

Cinema Fanatic’s Favorite Fifteen Films of 2011


While, for me, 2011 was not as a great a year in cinema as 2009 (many of the films I loved from that year I didn’t get to see until Jan of 2010, but still), I found myself loving more films this year than I did last year. In fact, you may notice that although I claim this is a list of fifteen films, it in fact contains sixteen films. There is one tie and I will explain my choice when I get to it. Last year before the year ended I managed to watch 53 new releases; this year I saw 57 (which is kind of pitifully low when you consider how many new-to-me films I saw this year; but that’s neither here nor there and you have to wait until tomorrow to read about that cinematic odyssey). I want to point out that my top five films have not changed since October, but the ten (eleven) that follow have been shifted and adjusted many, many times since then. Probably when I rewatch those films late on this list might still evolve some. I also want to mention that there were at least two films that I wanted to see before the end of the year that I was not able to see (The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo and The Adventures of Tintin: The Secret of the Unicorn); as always, there is no way to know whether those films would have even made the list had I seen them, but I wanted to point out that I’ve yet to see them so that comments of “where is ***?!” didn’t ensue. Okay, enough chatter, on to the list.

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Detroit Film Critics Like “The Artist,” “Shame”


Best Picture
The Artist

Best Director
Michel Hazanavicius – The Artist

Best Actor
Michael Fassbender – Shame

Best Actress
Michelle Williams – My Week with Marilyn

Best Supporting Actor
Christopher Plummer – Beginners

Best Supporting Actress
Carey Mulligan – Shame

Best Breakthrough Performance
Jessica Chastain – Tree of Life, The Help, The Debt, Take Shelter

Best Ensemble
Carnage

Best Screenplay
Moneyball

Best Documentary
Tabloid

“Shame,” “Tyrannosaur” and “Tinker Tailor” Lead British Independent Film Award Nominations


So many films on this list that I’ve yet to see, but definitely want to. Hopefully we’ll see a little bit of an overlap between these nominations and the Oscars. Mostly I’m thinking for Steve McQueen, Michael Fassbender and Carey Mulligan, though Shame‘s NC-17 rating may still be a hurdle the film’ll need to overcome stateside. I’d also like to see a Best Actor nomination for Gary Oldman. I still haven’t seen Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy, but boy is he overdue. He’s never even been nominated! That’s a travesty that must be remedied soon.

The winners are decided by an independent jury comprised of people from within the British film industry. This year’s jury includes: Josh Appignanesi (Director / Writer), Lucy Bevan (Casting Director), Edith Bowman (Broadcaster), Mike Goodridge (Editor), Ed Hogg (Actor), Neil Lamont (Art Director), Mary McCartney (Photographer), Molly Nyman (Composer), Debs Paterson (Director / Writer), Tracey Seaward (Producer), Charles Steel (Producer), David Thewlis (Actor), Ruth Wilson (Actress) and Justine Wright (Editor). The winners be announced on December 4th. Full list of nominees after the cut.

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New Trailer For Steve McQueen’s “Shame”


This looks fantastic. I’m already really digging the mood and Fassbender and Mulligan seem to be firing on all cylinders.

You can watch the trailer here. Shame is set to open in the US on December 2nd.

“Faust” Wins Golden Lion, Fassbender Best Actor At Venice


Russian director Aleksander Sokurov’s “Faust,” a new take on The German legend about the quest for knowledge at all cost, won the Golden Lion prize at the Venice Film Festival on Saturday.

Dense and difficult to watch, “Faust” was nevertheless one of the critics’ top choices among the 23 in-competition films at Venice this year. It snapped up the top prize by the jury headed by Darren Aronofsky, whose “Black Swan” opened Venice last year.

The best actor award went to Michael Fassbender for his portrayal as a sex addict in Steve McQueen’s “Shame,” while the best actress award went to Deanie Yip, who plays an aging domestic servant opposite her master in Hong Kong director Ann Hui’s “A Simple Life.”

The Silver Lion prize for best director went to this year’s surprise entry at the Lido, Beijing-based Shangjun Cai for “People Mountain People Sea.” And the special jury prize went to the Italian-French production “Terraferma,” about the influx of migrants to a tiny Italian island, by Emanuele Crialese.

All contenders at the world’s oldest film festival were world premieres.

“Faust” tells the tale of a professor, played by Johannes Zeiler, who craves knowledge and sells his soul for the love of Margarete, played by Isolda Dychauk. The Mephistopheles character is played by Anton Adasinskiy.

The film marks the final chapter in Sokurov’s four-film look at the relationship between man and power that began with “Moloch” in 1999 about Hitler, “Taurus” a year later about Lenin and the 2005 film “The Sun” about Japanese Emperor Hirohito.

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