Blog Archives

Movie Quote of the Day – Cause for Alarm!, 1951 (dir. Tay Garnett)


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Ellen Jones: It was one of those awful dreams, the kind I used to have when George was overseas. That man lying there was George, my husband, and he was dead. He died trying to kill me.

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Movie Quote of the Day – The Farmer’s Daughter, 1947 (dir. H.C. Potter)


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Glenn Morley: She doesn’t know anything about politics. How can she, I ask you, be expected to give of such things as the minimum wage bill, the full employment bill, the Missouri Valley, the Columbia Valley authorities amendments, the permanent MBPC, atomic bomb control, poll tax, national. . ., well a hundred other things.
Katrin Holstrom: Can you?
Glenn Morley: That’s beside the point. I am already a congressman.

Movie Quote of the Day – Employees’ Entrance, 1933 (dir. Roy Del Ruth)


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Kurt Anderson: With your looks, you shouldn’t have any trouble getting a job.
Madeleine: Thank you. But, I’d rather be employed for my brains.

From The Warner Archive: Forbidden Hollywood, Vol. 7


At this point y’all should be pretty well-versed in Pre-Code Hollywood and all its glory. The Warner Archive is at it again, releasing Vol. 7 of the ever-popular Forbidden Hollywood series. This set features film that, while not the “best” films of the era, feature some of the most salacious scenarios that Hollywood had to offer at the time. These are the kind of morally “loose” films that caused the Catholic church to call the industry indecent. They’re also more sexually charged than most current Hollywood films. The films included in this set are: William A. Wellman’s The Hatchet Man, Edgar Selwyn’s Skyscraper Souls, Roy Del Ruth’s Employees’ Entrance and Robert Florey’s Ex-Lady.

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Oscar Vault Monday – The Bishop’s Wife, 1947 (dir. Henry Koster)


A lot of quality classic films that revolve around Christmas unfairly get overlooked as simply a seasonal film, worth pulling out in December only. This is something I hate to see, because a lot of these classic films are such wonderful, timeless films that deserve much more attention than they often receive. Case in point: The Bishop’s Wife. At the time of its release it was nominated for multiple Oscars and widely revered, now it’s mostly only talked about at Christmastime. I suppose by writing about it in December, I’m doing exactly the same thing. Oh well. I love this film. For the longest time it was my favorite Cary Grant film (it’s still in my Top 5) and is endlessly watchable. Like I said earlier, it was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning one: Best Sound (won), Best Score, Best Film Editing and Best Picture. It was up against Crossfire, Great Expectations, Miracle on 34th Street (another Christmas-themed film) and winner Gentleman’s Agreement.

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