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Movie Quote of the Day – Hush. . .Hush, Sweet Charlotte, 1964 (dir. Robert Aldrich)


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Miriam: Yes, I told Jewel. And I told your father too. Why wouldn’t I? After all, I wasn’t much more than a child then. And all I ever got in this house was people telling me how lucky I was and your father always favoring you and holding you up as an example! Why wouldn’t I tell him that his pure, darling little girl was having a dirty little affair with a married man?
Charlotte: You’re a vile, sorry little bitch!

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Movie Quote of the Day – The Old Maid, 1939 (dir. Edmund Goulding)


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Tina: I’ll go, but before I go, you’ve got to know that I’m sick your spying and fault-finding and meddling–
Delia Lovell: No, Tina!
Tina: You can say what you want to me Mummy, because you understand me and I love you. But she’s just a sour old maid who hates me–
Delia Lovell: Tina!
Tina: –because I’m young and attractive and in love, while she’s old and hideous and dried up and has never known anything about love!

Movie Quote of the Day – Dead Ringer, 1964 (dir. Paul Henreid)


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Edith Phillips: I have a cocktail lounge on Figueroa called Edie’s.
Margaret DeLorca: A cocktail lounge? Why didn’t you ask me–
Edith Phillips: For the fare out of town? That last time I left Los Angeles, you met me at the station with the glad news that you were pregnant and that Frank was marrying you.
Margaret DeLorca: Oh, but Edith, that was twenty years ago!
Edith Phillips: To be exact, eighteen!
Margaret DeLorca: You really hate me, don’t you? You’ve never forgiven me in all these years.
Edith Phillips: Why should I? Tell me why I should.
Margaret DeLorca: We’re sisters!
Edith Phillips: So we are. And to Hell with you!

From The Warner Archive: Forbidden Hollywood, Vol. 7


At this point y’all should be pretty well-versed in Pre-Code Hollywood and all its glory. The Warner Archive is at it again, releasing Vol. 7 of the ever-popular Forbidden Hollywood series. This set features film that, while not the “best” films of the era, feature some of the most salacious scenarios that Hollywood had to offer at the time. These are the kind of morally “loose” films that caused the Catholic church to call the industry indecent. They’re also more sexually charged than most current Hollywood films. The films included in this set are: William A. Wellman’s The Hatchet Man, Edgar Selwyn’s Skyscraper Souls, Roy Del Ruth’s Employees’ Entrance and Robert Florey’s Ex-Lady.

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Movie Quote of the Day – Dark Victory, 1939 (dir. Edmund Goulding)


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Judith: I’ve never taken orders from anyone. As long as I live, I’ll never take orders from anyone. I’ll tell you something else. I’m well, absolutely well. I’m young and strong and nothing can touch me.

Movie Quote of the Day – Jezebel, 1938 (dir. William Wyler)


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Preston Dillard: Naturally, we claim the right to the customs we were born to. Even some of us who question the value of those customs.
Buck Cantrell: I like my convictions undiluted, same as I do my bourbon.

Oscar Vault Monday – Jezebel, 1938 (dir. William Wyler)


I really love this film. I have watched it many times. It’s one that gets richer each time you watch it. Often, you hear it dismissed, or at least introduced, as Bette Davis’s Gone With The Wind, but it is definitely more than just a consolation prize. This film represents a turning point in Davis’s career and it was after her phenomenal turn in this film that she became the superstar we now know and love. The film was nominated for five Academy Award, won two: Best Cinematography, Best Score, Best Supporting Actress Fay Bainter (won), Best Actress Bette Davis (won), Best Picture. The other films nominated for Best Picture that year were The Adventures of Robin Hood, Alexander’s Ragtime Band, Boys Town, The Citadel, Four Daughters, La Grande Illusion, Pygmalion, Test Pilot, and winner You Can’t Take It With You. I have actually seen all of these films, and they are ALL fantastic.

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Movie Quote of the Day – The Little Foxes, 1941 (dir. William Wyler)


Regina Giddens: I hope you die. I hope you die soon. I’ll be waiting for you to die.

Movie Quote of the Day – The Cabin In The Cotton, 1932 (dir. Michael Curtiz)


Madge: I’d like to kiss you, but I just washed my hair.

2011 in Films: A Year-Long Cinematic Odyssey Through 1,117 New-To-Me Films


Last year I watched 517 new-to-me films and I thought that number was ridiculously large. Well, this year not only did I reach that number, I surpassed it with an additional 600 new-to-me films, bringing my grand total to 1,117 new-to-me films for 2011. Don’t believe me? There’s a list after the cut of every film, broken down by month so you can see just exactly what films I watched. I don’t know how to explain how I watched so many films. I will say, it all started with a bet from CybelDP on Twitter. The rest, as they say, is history.

Some life information: for the first half of the year I worked as a substitute teacher (which meant only 1 to 2 days of work a week) and lived in the back of my parents’ house and watched Turner Classic Movies non-stop. From the end of May on I moved to San Francisco, where I now go to the Academy of Art University working towards an MFA in film editing. Yet, somehow amongst all that I managed to watch A LOT OF FRICKIN’ MOVIES. I also watched a lot of movies in theaters (thank you very much Castro Theatre) for the first time that were films I’d already seen. If you take a look at each of my monthly wrap-ups, I talk about what films those were.

Last year in my end of the year post I wrote about how many films with certain stars that I’d seen and stuff like that. The sheer volume of films I saw this year makes that task pretty difficult. I will say, I saw a lot of films featuring the following and if you want to try to look through my list and figure out exact numbers, be my guest: Orson Welles, Buster Keaton, James Cagney, Lew Ayres, Joseph Cotten, Joel McCrea, Glenn Ford, Henry Fonda, Ray Milland, Robert Taylor, Ryan O’Neal, Joan Blondell, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis and Jean Harlow. There are probably others whose filmographies I put giant dents in this year, but those are the ones that really stuck out. Speaking of filmographies, I also finished a handful of director filmographies this year: Woody Allen, Jim Jarmusch and Martin Scorsese. I also came close to finishing off Orson Welles, Stanley Kubrick and Elia Kazan and watched a bunch of films by Robert Altman, Peter Bogdanovich, Fritz Lang and John Ford. I also discovered a love for Westerns that I never knew I had (well, other than Clint Eastwood westerns, which I always loved). Oh, and I’ve only got 76 Best Picture nominated films left to see. That’s out of 487 films total, so I think I’m doing pretty well there.

One last thing before I reveal the list and my favorite new-to-me film of the year: in this past year I have felt more intellectually stimulated than I have ever felt before. Everyday I watched films and every film that I watched I gathered new information and my brain felt so alive and so active; it’s an amazing feeling for sure. I would go to bed thinking about the films I’d watched that day and the actors and directors and screenwriters that I learned about. I would think about Cedric Gibbons and Douglas Shearer and the amazing jobs they did at MGM and Irving Thalberg’s genius and how I wish I could be as prolific as Woody Allen. Then I would wake up the next day and start all over again and the more I watched the more everything fit together, the more I got from every film because I could see how it fit within the framework of cinema’s history. It was an amazing year of discovery and reflection and I wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world.

And, now, without further ado, the list. Ps. there’s more writing after the list, so please keep reading! Also, for some reason WordPress can’t handle a bulleted list that has four digits, so it cuts off the numbers towards the end of the list. But I think you can still figure out what’s what.
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