Blog Archives

Movie Quote of the Day – Ain’t Them Bodies Saints, 2013 (dir. David Lowery)


ain't_them_bodies_saints

Ruth Guthrie: I haven’t slept in four years. And I’m tired. I’m so goddamn tired.
Patrick Wheeler: Then rest.

“The Artist” Named Best Picture, Director, Rooney Mara Best Actress By St. Louis Film Critics


Best Film
The Artist
runner-up: The Descendants

Best Director
Michel Hazanavicius (The Artist)
runner-up: Terrence Malick (Tree of Life)

Best Actor
George Clooney (The Descendants)
runner-up: Ryan Gosling (Drive)

Best Actress
Rooney Mara (The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo)
runners-up – tied: Meryl Streep (The Iron Lady) and Michelle Williams (My Week With Marilyn)

Best Supporting Actor
Albert Brooks (Drive)
runner-up: Alan Rickman (Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, Part 2)

Best Supporting Actress
Bérénice Bejo (The Artist)
runners-up – tied: Octavia Spencer (The Help) and Shailene Woodley (The Descendants)

Best Original Screenplay
Michel Hazanavicius (The Artist)
runner-up: Will Reiser (50/50)

Best Adapted Screenplay
Alexander Payne, Nat Faxon, Jim Rash and Kaui Hart Hemmings (novel) for The Descendants
runner-up: Steven Zaillian, Aaron Sorkin, Stan Chervin and Michael Lewis (book) for Moneyball

Best Cinematography
Emmanuel Lubezki (Tree Of Life)
runners-up – tied: Jeff Cronenweth (The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo)
and Janusz Kaminski (War Horse)

Best Visual Effects
Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows, Part 2
runner-up: Rise Of The Planet Of The Apes

Best Music
The Artist
runner-up: Drive

Best Foreign-Language Film
13 Assassins
runner-up: Winter in Wartime

Best Documentary
Being Elmo
runner-up: Tabloid

Best Comedy
Bridesmaids
runner-up: Midnight In Paris

Best Animated Film
The Adventures of Tintin
runner-up: Rango

Best Art-House or Festival Film
– for artistic excellence in quality art-house cinema, limited to films that played at film festivals or film series here or those that had a limited-release here, playing one or two cinemas.
We Need To Talk About Kevin
runner-up: Win Win

Best Scene
– favorite movie scene or sequence
The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo: the opening credits
runner-up: The Artist: the dance scene finale

Scorsese’s “Hugo” Named Best Film of the Year by the National Board of Review


I very rarely agree 100% with the NBR, but this year’s list is pretty decent, though I still need to see a handful of their choices.. They always include Eastwood, no matter what the consensus is on his films, though. I still haven’t seen J. Edgar, so I can’t comment just yet. I’m happy to see Drive on their list, but a little miffed to see the final Harry Potter on there, because from a stand-alone film point-of-view it failed miserably.

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Trailer and Poster for Fincher’s The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo


This looks…interesting. I love Fincher so I’ll put aside my dislike of Daniel Craig and see this in theaters for sure.

 

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15 Breakthrough Performers of 2010


Many of the stars on last year’s list continued to dominate cinema in 2010; and just like last year a few of the stars on this year’s list have been working for quite some time, but in 2010 they’re finally getting their due.

Andrew Garfield made his debut in 2007 in the not-well received Lions For Lambs and the under-seen Boy A. Last year he was fabulous in Terry Gilliam’s The Imaginarium of Doctor Parnassus, sadly that too went a little under the radar. This year, however, Garfield had two stand-out performances: as Tommy in the much-debated adaptation of Never Let Me Go and as Eduardo Saverin in David Fincher Best Picture contender The Social Network. Garfield has received multiple nominations for his performance in the latter and is widely considered a front-runner for a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nomination next week. He’s also been named the new Spiderman, which has begun filming already and is due out in theaters in 2012.

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David Fincher’s “The Social Network” Eloquently Defines A Generation


I started college in August of 2004 at the University of California, Berkeley. At that point Facebook was only at a handful of universities, Cal being one of them. In September 2004 the first of several lawsuits were filed against Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg. At that point everyone I knew at college, which was not many people, had a Facebook profile. Actually it was still called “The Facebook” in the URL. I shared this story because having been through practically all the changes Facebook has gone through in the last six years, made watching David Fincher’s new film The Social Network like reliving college all over again. There were so many little things, Eisenberg on his LiveJournal among others, that made me have little tinges of nostalgia for a time that isn’t really even all that long ago. I was sort of amazed that Fincher and screenwriter Aaron Sorkin were able to capture the essence of my generation, an essence I have been trying to explain to my father for years now, so effortlessly while themselves being so removed from it. Really though, Fincher is so good a recreating eras it’s not all that surprising.


Minor spoilers after the cut.

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