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Movie Quote of the Day – Who’s That Knocking at My Door, 1967 (dir. Martin Scorsese)


Girl: Well, I’m not used to admitting I like Westerns.
J.R.: Oh, yeah. Why not, huh? Everybody should like Westerns. Solve everybody’s problems if they liked Westerns.
Girl: Okay, I like Westerns!
J.R.: Okay, then.

January 2012 in Films: Il Cinema Italiano, Film Noir, Podcasts and Interviews


January was a great month for me. As I said in my end-of-the-year post at the beginning of the month, I have decided to tackle world cinema (well, outside France, which I have done pretty well with). So far my concentrations have been on Italian cinema (I even learned Italian this month!), mostly watching late-50s-early-60s Italian cinema, though I did watch a few Italian silents as well. I have more than fallen in love with Marcello Mastroianni. I also covered Noir City X, the Film Noir Foundation‘s tenth annual film noir festival here in San Francisco. You can read my wrap-up post here at YAM Magazine. Don’t forget the Oscar nominations came out this month; you can hear my thoughts on those here at The Matinee. Lastly, yesterday Warner Bros. gave me the opportunity to interview Stephen Bogart, son of legends Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall, over the phone. You can read that interview here. As always, a round up of all the new-to-me films I watched this last month is after the cut (I think I also rewatched about 18 films this month on top of all the new-to-me ones). So many great films. So many more to watch.

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Director’s Guild of America Nominations Announced


  • Woody Allen – Midnight In Paris
  • David Fincher – The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo
  • Michel Hazanavicius – The Artist
  • Alexander Payne – The Descendants
  • Martin Scorsese – Hugo
The winner in the Feature Film category will be announced at the 64th Annual DGA Awards dinner and ceremony on Saturday evening, January 28, 2012, at the Grand Ballroom at Hollywood & Highland.  The DGA Awards will be hosted by director/actor/producer Kelsey Grammer. [source]

2011 in Films: A Year-Long Cinematic Odyssey Through 1,117 New-To-Me Films


Last year I watched 517 new-to-me films and I thought that number was ridiculously large. Well, this year not only did I reach that number, I surpassed it with an additional 600 new-to-me films, bringing my grand total to 1,117 new-to-me films for 2011. Don’t believe me? There’s a list after the cut of every film, broken down by month so you can see just exactly what films I watched. I don’t know how to explain how I watched so many films. I will say, it all started with a bet from CybelDP on Twitter. The rest, as they say, is history.

Some life information: for the first half of the year I worked as a substitute teacher (which meant only 1 to 2 days of work a week) and lived in the back of my parents’ house and watched Turner Classic Movies non-stop. From the end of May on I moved to San Francisco, where I now go to the Academy of Art University working towards an MFA in film editing. Yet, somehow amongst all that I managed to watch A LOT OF FRICKIN’ MOVIES. I also watched a lot of movies in theaters (thank you very much Castro Theatre) for the first time that were films I’d already seen. If you take a look at each of my monthly wrap-ups, I talk about what films those were.

Last year in my end of the year post I wrote about how many films with certain stars that I’d seen and stuff like that. The sheer volume of films I saw this year makes that task pretty difficult. I will say, I saw a lot of films featuring the following and if you want to try to look through my list and figure out exact numbers, be my guest: Orson Welles, Buster Keaton, James Cagney, Lew Ayres, Joseph Cotten, Joel McCrea, Glenn Ford, Henry Fonda, Ray Milland, Robert Taylor, Ryan O’Neal, Joan Blondell, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis and Jean Harlow. There are probably others whose filmographies I put giant dents in this year, but those are the ones that really stuck out. Speaking of filmographies, I also finished a handful of director filmographies this year: Woody Allen, Jim Jarmusch and Martin Scorsese. I also came close to finishing off Orson Welles, Stanley Kubrick and Elia Kazan and watched a bunch of films by Robert Altman, Peter Bogdanovich, Fritz Lang and John Ford. I also discovered a love for Westerns that I never knew I had (well, other than Clint Eastwood westerns, which I always loved). Oh, and I’ve only got 76 Best Picture nominated films left to see. That’s out of 487 films total, so I think I’m doing pretty well there.

One last thing before I reveal the list and my favorite new-to-me film of the year: in this past year I have felt more intellectually stimulated than I have ever felt before. Everyday I watched films and every film that I watched I gathered new information and my brain felt so alive and so active; it’s an amazing feeling for sure. I would go to bed thinking about the films I’d watched that day and the actors and directors and screenwriters that I learned about. I would think about Cedric Gibbons and Douglas Shearer and the amazing jobs they did at MGM and Irving Thalberg’s genius and how I wish I could be as prolific as Woody Allen. Then I would wake up the next day and start all over again and the more I watched the more everything fit together, the more I got from every film because I could see how it fit within the framework of cinema’s history. It was an amazing year of discovery and reflection and I wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world.

And, now, without further ado, the list. Ps. there’s more writing after the list, so please keep reading! Also, for some reason WordPress can’t handle a bulleted list that has four digits, so it cuts off the numbers towards the end of the list. But I think you can still figure out what’s what.
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Movie Quote of the Day – Mean Streets, 1973 (dir. Martin Scorsese)


Johnny Boy: Hey Mikey, you’re really something, you know that? What’s the matter? You too good for this ten dollars? You too good for it? It’s a good ten dollars. You know something, Mikey, you make me laugh, you know that? You know, I borrow money all over this neighborhood, left and right from everybody, I never pay them back. So, I can’t borrow no money from nobody no more, right? So who does that leave me to borrow money from but you? I borrow money from you, because you’re the only jerk-off around here who I can borrow money from without payin’ back, right? Right? You know, ’cause that’s what you are, that’s what I think of you: a jerk-off. You’re smiling, right, because you’re a  jerk-off! You’re  a fucking jerk-off. I’ll tell ‘ya something else, Mikey, [lights ten-dollar bill on fire] I fuck you right where you breath, because I don’t give two shits about you or nobody else.

Southeastern Film Critics Association Name “The Descendants” Best Picture, Scorsese Best Director


Top Ten Films
The Descendants
The Artist
Hugo
Moneyball
The Tree of Life
Drive
Midnight in Paris
Win Win
War Horse
The Help

Best Actor
Winner – George Clooney (The Descendants)
Runner-up – Michael Fassbender (Shame)

Best Actress
Winner – Meryl Streep, The Iron Lady
Runner-up – Tilda Swinton, We Need to Talk About Kevin

Best Supporting Actor
Winner – Christopher Plummer, Beginners
Runner-up – Albert Brooks, Drive

Best Supporting Actress
Winner – Janet McTeer, Albert Nobbs
Runner-up – Shailene Woodley, The Descendants

Best Ensemble
Winner – The Help
Runner-up – The Descendants

Best Director
Winner – Martin Scorsese, Hugo
Runner-up – Michel Hazanavicius, The Artist

Best Original Screenplay
Winner – Midnight in Paris
Runner-up – The Artist

Best Adapted Screenplay
Winner – The Descendants
Runner-up – Moneyball

Best Documentary
Winner – Project Nim
Runner-up – Tabloid

Best Foreign Language Film
Winner – A Separation
Runner-up – The Skin I Live In

Best Animated Film
Winner – Rango
Runner-up – The Adventures of Tintin

Best Cinematography
Winner – The Tree of Life
Runner-up – Hugo

The Gene Wyatt Award
Winner – The Help
Runner-up – Undefeated

Boston Society of Film Critics Names “The Artist” Best Picture


Best Picture  – “The Artist”

Best Actor –  Brad Pitt for “Moneyball”

Best Actress – Michelle Williams for “My Week with Marilyn”

Best Supporting Actor –  Albert Brooks for “Drive”

Best Supporting Actress –  Melissa McCarthy for “Bridesmaids”

Best Director – Martin Scorses for “Hugo”

Best Screenplay – Moneyball

Best Cinematography – Emmanuel Lubezki for “The Tree of Life”

Best Documentary – “Project Nim”

Best Foreign-Language Film – “Incendies”

Best Animated Film –  Rango

Best Film Editing (awarded in memory of Karen Schmeer) – Christian Marclay for “The Clock”

Best New Filmmaker (awarded in memory of David Brudnoy) –  Sean Durkin for “Martha Marcy May Marlene”

Best Ensemble Cast –  Carnage

Best Use of Music in a Film  –  Tie: “Drive” and “The Artist”

The Artist, Scorsese Winners At Washington D.C. Area Film Critics Association Awards


Looks like the race is off to be more of the same film winning over and over again. At least the acting categories are a little different for this critics group. The winners are after the cut; you can see the full list of nominees here.

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Scorsese’s “Hugo” Named Best Film of the Year by the National Board of Review


I very rarely agree 100% with the NBR, but this year’s list is pretty decent, though I still need to see a handful of their choices.. They always include Eastwood, no matter what the consensus is on his films, though. I still haven’t seen J. Edgar, so I can’t comment just yet. I’m happy to see Drive on their list, but a little miffed to see the final Harry Potter on there, because from a stand-alone film point-of-view it failed miserably.

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Movie Quote of the Day – The King of Comedy, 1983 (dir. Martin Scorsese)


Rupert Pupkin: So I made a mistake!
Jerry Langford: So did Hitler!
Rupert Pupkin: All right. This is the way it is when you’re famous.
Jerry Langford: Do you understand now?
Rupert Pupkin: That’s how you guys are, huh?
Jerry Langford: No, not them. Me, yeah.
Rupert Pupkin: That’s how you are? When you reach the top?
Jerry Langford: No, I was that way before.