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Oscar Vault Monday – The Longest Day, 1962 (dir. Ken Annakin, Andrew Marton and Bernhard Wicki)


The trailer for The Longest Day calls this one of the most ambitious films ever made and I think that is still true today. It would take multiple posts to write about everything there is to write about with this film. Instead, I am going to write about a few of my favorite performers in the film (look at that cast list; it’s insane!). You can read a lot about the production of the film here.  I used to love this movie when I was a kid and was lucky enough to see it on the big screen at the TCM Film Festival in 2012 (first thing in the morning, too!). If you ever get a chance to see it on the big screen, don’t miss it! It’s amazing. The film was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning two: Best Film Editing, Best B&W Art Direction, Best B&W Cinematography (won),  Best Special Effects and Best Picture. The other films nominated for Best Picture that year were: The Music Man, Mutiny on the Bounty, To Kill a Mockingbird and winner Lawrence of Arabia.

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Movie Quote of the Day – Young Mr. Lincoln, 1939 (dir. John Ford)


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Abraham Lincoln: Law. “That’s the rights of persons and the rights of things. The rights of life, reputation and liberty. The rights to acquire and hold property. Wrongs are violations of those rights.” By jing, that’s all there is to it. Right and wrong.

Movie Quote of the Day – Jezebel, 1938 (dir. William Wyler)


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Preston Dillard: Naturally, we claim the right to the customs we were born to. Even some of us who question the value of those customs.
Buck Cantrell: I like my convictions undiluted, same as I do my bourbon.

TCM To Honor Jane Fonda At 2013 Film Festival


The first year I attended they honored Peter O’Toole (oh god I will never forget 2011 O’Toole-fest) and last year they honored Kim Novak. This year Ms. Jane Fonda will be getting her hands in the cement. Her choice of film to present is On Golden Pond, the film in which she was able to work with her father, legend Henry Fonda, who finally won an Academy Award after five decades in the industry. I’ll post the full press release below. I hope Jane is as sassy as I imagine!

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Movie Quote of the Day – You Only Live Once, 1937 (dir. Fritz Lang)


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Eddie Taylor: Lots of people in love get to live inside a house…
Joan Graham: That doesn’t matter now. Maybe anywhere is our home. In the car, out on that cold star, anywhere’s our home.

Oscar Vault Monday – Jezebel, 1938 (dir. William Wyler)


I really love this film. I have watched it many times. It’s one that gets richer each time you watch it. Often, you hear it dismissed, or at least introduced, as Bette Davis’s Gone With The Wind, but it is definitely more than just a consolation prize. This film represents a turning point in Davis’s career and it was after her phenomenal turn in this film that she became the superstar we now know and love. The film was nominated for five Academy Award, won two: Best Cinematography, Best Score, Best Supporting Actress Fay Bainter (won), Best Actress Bette Davis (won), Best Picture. The other films nominated for Best Picture that year were The Adventures of Robin Hood, Alexander’s Ragtime Band, Boys Town, The Citadel, Four Daughters, La Grande Illusion, Pygmalion, Test Pilot, and winner You Can’t Take It With You. I have actually seen all of these films, and they are ALL fantastic.

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Movie Quote of the Day – The Wrong Man, 1956 (dir. Alfred Hitchcock)


Lt. Bowers: How do you explain it?
Christopher Emmanuel ‘Manny’ Balestrero: I made a mistake.
Lt. Bowers: And so did the hold up man. And it happens to be the same mistake.

Movie Quote of the Day – The Tin Star, 1957 (dir. Anthony Mann)


Sheriff Ben Owens: You notice everything, don’t you?
Morg Hickman: I notice you’re wearing your guns too low.
Sheriff Ben Owens: That’s where Sheriff Parker wore his.
Morg Hickman: Parker’s dead.

2011 in Films: A Year-Long Cinematic Odyssey Through 1,117 New-To-Me Films


Last year I watched 517 new-to-me films and I thought that number was ridiculously large. Well, this year not only did I reach that number, I surpassed it with an additional 600 new-to-me films, bringing my grand total to 1,117 new-to-me films for 2011. Don’t believe me? There’s a list after the cut of every film, broken down by month so you can see just exactly what films I watched. I don’t know how to explain how I watched so many films. I will say, it all started with a bet from CybelDP on Twitter. The rest, as they say, is history.

Some life information: for the first half of the year I worked as a substitute teacher (which meant only 1 to 2 days of work a week) and lived in the back of my parents’ house and watched Turner Classic Movies non-stop. From the end of May on I moved to San Francisco, where I now go to the Academy of Art University working towards an MFA in film editing. Yet, somehow amongst all that I managed to watch A LOT OF FRICKIN’ MOVIES. I also watched a lot of movies in theaters (thank you very much Castro Theatre) for the first time that were films I’d already seen. If you take a look at each of my monthly wrap-ups, I talk about what films those were.

Last year in my end of the year post I wrote about how many films with certain stars that I’d seen and stuff like that. The sheer volume of films I saw this year makes that task pretty difficult. I will say, I saw a lot of films featuring the following and if you want to try to look through my list and figure out exact numbers, be my guest: Orson Welles, Buster Keaton, James Cagney, Lew Ayres, Joseph Cotten, Joel McCrea, Glenn Ford, Henry Fonda, Ray Milland, Robert Taylor, Ryan O’Neal, Joan Blondell, Joan Crawford, Bette Davis and Jean Harlow. There are probably others whose filmographies I put giant dents in this year, but those are the ones that really stuck out. Speaking of filmographies, I also finished a handful of director filmographies this year: Woody Allen, Jim Jarmusch and Martin Scorsese. I also came close to finishing off Orson Welles, Stanley Kubrick and Elia Kazan and watched a bunch of films by Robert Altman, Peter Bogdanovich, Fritz Lang and John Ford. I also discovered a love for Westerns that I never knew I had (well, other than Clint Eastwood westerns, which I always loved). Oh, and I’ve only got 76 Best Picture nominated films left to see. That’s out of 487 films total, so I think I’m doing pretty well there.

One last thing before I reveal the list and my favorite new-to-me film of the year: in this past year I have felt more intellectually stimulated than I have ever felt before. Everyday I watched films and every film that I watched I gathered new information and my brain felt so alive and so active; it’s an amazing feeling for sure. I would go to bed thinking about the films I’d watched that day and the actors and directors and screenwriters that I learned about. I would think about Cedric Gibbons and Douglas Shearer and the amazing jobs they did at MGM and Irving Thalberg’s genius and how I wish I could be as prolific as Woody Allen. Then I would wake up the next day and start all over again and the more I watched the more everything fit together, the more I got from every film because I could see how it fit within the framework of cinema’s history. It was an amazing year of discovery and reflection and I wouldn’t trade it for anything in the world.

And, now, without further ado, the list. Ps. there’s more writing after the list, so please keep reading! Also, for some reason WordPress can’t handle a bulleted list that has four digits, so it cuts off the numbers towards the end of the list. But I think you can still figure out what’s what.
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Movie Quote of the Day – The Grapes of Wrath, 1940 (dir. John Ford)


Ma Joad: How am I gonna know about ya, Tommy? Why they could kill ya and I’d never know. They could hurt ya. How am I gonna know?
Tom Joad: Well, maybe it’s like Casy says. A fellow ain’t got a soul of his own, just little piece of a big soul, the one big soul that belongs to everybody, then. . .
Ma Joad: Then what, Tom?
Tom Joad: Then it don’t matter. I’ll be all around in the dark – I’ll be everywhere. Wherever you can look – wherever there’s a fight, so hungry people can eat, I’ll be there. Wherever there’s a cop beatin’ up a guy, I’ll be there. I’ll be in the way guys yell when they’re mad. I’ll be in the way kids laugh when they’re hungry and they know supper’s ready, and when the people are eatin’ the stuff they raise and livin’ in the houses they build – I’ll be there, too.